All posts by Daniela Ganelin

About Daniela Ganelin

I co-founded the Linguistic Club in 2011.

ASL Discourse (Guest Speaker Kristin Mulrooney, 3/19/14)

Kristin Mulrooney, Linguistics Professor at Gallaudet University, concluded our ASL series with a lecture on the challenges of creating signing avatars, in particular facial expressions. Her slideshow can be seen here.

NOTES (thanks to AC):

Topics

Details

Linguistics Academia applied to the real world
The Facial Action Coding SystemApplication of Linguistics to the Real World

ASL Math Definition Dictionary

  • The face conveys many important aspects of ASL
    • emotion
    • grammatical information
    • ASL mouth gestures
    • English mouthing
    • discourse level information
  • The facial coding system
    • What is it?
      • Developed in the 1970’s to codify facial expressions by Dr. Eckmen
      • Segmented portions of the human face and mapped its movement
    • Found six basic expressions
      • Happiness
      • Fear
      • Anger
      • Surprise
      • Sadness
      • Disgust
    • Use of the facial coding system
      • Can be used to determine lying
      • When someone lies, there are tell signs which can be tracked using FACS
  • Example of Application: VCom3D and Dr. Mulrooney
    • Broad goal: determine another method of language exposure to deaf children
    • Specific goals
      • Create a life like avatar that accurately convey facial expressions
  • FACS and VCom3D
    • After being trained in using FACS, VCom3D began using FACS to create facial expressions
    • The facial expressions were not exactly accurate because certain facial expressions could convey multiple emotions
  • Year 1: Began indexing the facial expressions from previous projects
    • Done!
  • Year 2: Review math definitions that were signed
    • They are currently waiting for the Avatars to be delivered to the researchers

ASL Syntax (Guest Speaker Miako Rankin, 3/12/14)

Gallaudet University Assistant Professor of Linguistics Miako Rankin discussed research in ASL syntax. Dr. Rankin was supposed to visit last month, but had to reschedule because of the ice day. If you didn’t get a chance to skim through the reading last time, you can find it here.

We had a nice discussion about various aspects of ASL syntax and culture. We watched videos of ASL stories and poems.

SLIYS Linguistics Summer Camp

We received an email from the Summer Linguistic Institute for Youth Scholars at Ohio State University. It’s copied below if you’re interested — sounds like a fun opportunity. The flyer is available here.

We’re writing to you from the Ohio State University Linguistics Department to let you know about a great opportunity for high school students interested in linguistics. For the last five years we’ve run a week long summer camp here at OSU called SLIYS – the Summer Linguistic Institute for Youth Scholars. SLIYS (pronounced like “slice”) is the nation’s only linguistics summer camp for high school students, and we want to share our program with high school linguistics clubs around the country.

SLIYS students spend one week living on campus here at Ohio State, gaining the tools to better understand how languages work. You will learn about sound systems, grammatical systems, writing systems, and the ways that speakers of different languages interact with each other.

Whether you want to become a foreign language teacher, join the Peace Corps, live in another country, or study languages or linguistics in college, the knowledge you gain from your SLIYS experience is certain to help! SLIYS Instructors are members of the Department of Linguistics at the Ohio State University, including faculty, staff, and PhD candidates. We have a wide range of linguistic expertise and are familiar with an extensive and diverse collection of the world’s languages.

I’ve attached the flyer for this year’s program, which includes information on dates and costs. Please share this information at your next linguistics club meeting, and check out our website at http://linguistics.osu.edu/sliys. Feel free to contact us (sliys@ling.osu.edu) if you have any questions! We’re glad you’re interested in linguistics, and look forward to seeing you at SLIYS!